Tiananmen Date Over, Chinese Unblock Access To Google

Google China Now that the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protest and crackdown are over, China has restored access to Google services in the country. They had been totally blocked for roughly a month in the run up to the anniversary. The Chinese government had denied it was interfering with access to Google and implied there was a problem on Google's end. According to Reuters, Chinese users were once again denied access to Google search and Maps. Other services such as Flickr and South-Korean-based messaging services Line and KakaoTalk had also been blocked and are now restor [...]


How The EU Censors Google & Search Engines Just Like China

google-eu-featured.jpg When it comes to censorship, the European Union generally isn't one of the political entities that immediately comes to mind. But it should, especially since its new Right To Be Forgotten mandate has the political union acting in the same manner as that poster child of censorship, China. Sound crazy, that the EU could possibly be imposing censorship on search engines in the same way that China is notorious for? It's not crazy. It's real. In May, the European Court of Justice felt that anyone in the EU should have the right to ask for material to be removed from search engines like [...]


Thanks To “Right To Be Forgotten,” Google Now Censors The Press In The EU

right-forgotten-erase-past-600 The EU's Right To Be Forgotten removals have been happening for about a week on Google, and now news publications are discovering the fallout. For some searches, you can't find their news stories relating to certain people. In particular, both the BBC and the Guardian have shared examples of content that's now been "forgotten" in Google. The stories remain on the sites of both publications. You just can't locate them for certain searches related to the names of individuals they are about. (Postscript 5:50pm ET: Add the Daily Mail to the list, which has posted about removal notices it [...]


Google’s Right To Be Forgotten Form Gets 12,000 Submissions On First Day

right to be forgotten eu logo Google's new Right To Be Forgotten from has been up for just about a day now, and the company says that over 12,000 submissions have been received. Google confirmed the figures to Marketing Land, which had earlier been reported by Reuters. Google also said that at one point, it had been getting up to 20 requests per minute. Which countries generated the most requests? Google's not breaking that down, it said. But if the several thousand requests that Google already received before the form went up are any guide, Germany is likely the leader. Germans generated 40% of removal reques [...]


10 People Who Want To Be Forgotten By Google, From An Attempted Murderer To A Cyberstalker

privacy-anonymous-hacker-600 Who wants things removed from Google under the newly declared "right to be forgotten" in the European Union? A convicted cyberstalker, an attempted murderer, a politician, a business with bad reviews and a pedophile are among those making such requests to Google. Yesterday, the BBC noted the first three of the cases listed below. Marketing Land has also learned of them directly from a source, along with seven other requests that Google has received. The Politician Who Behaved Badly A former politician seeks to have links removed about his behavior while in office -- presumably unfla [...]


Twitter’s Latest Transparency Report Details Increases In DMCA, Removal & Information Requests

Twitter Logo Twitter's latest transparency report shows that the company is seeing double-digit increases in data-related requests so far this year from governments and other rights holders. Twitter breaks down the requests it gets into three types: information, removal and copyright notices. All three are up significantly so far in 2013 compared to the same time period a year ago. Information Requests: Twitter has received 1,157 of these so far this year, a 36 percent increase compared to the first half of 2012. Removal Requests: These went from just six last year to 60 so far in 2013, a 1,000% i [...]


Europe: Google Wins “Censorship” Battle, Slammed On Antitrust Proposals

Google Europe legal Google's struggles in Europe continue. However the company apparently has won something of a reprieve in its battle against the emerging "the right to be forgotten," which Google largely regards as censorship. But on the antitrust front, Google faces stepped up criticism of its settlement proposals from critics and opponents. On Monday, an advisory (non-binding) opinion from Niilo Jaeaeskinen of the EU Court of Justice found that Google cannot (or should not) be compelled to de-index material that was originally legally posted on third-party publisher sites. According to an article appe [...]


Twitter Loses French Appeal To Avoid Disclosing Hate-Speaker Names

Twitter Logo Twitter has lost an appeal in France to avoid disclosing the identities of people behind anti-Semitic hashtags that appeared and trended last year. Among them were #unjuifmort, which translates "a dead Jew," and “unbonjuif" ("a good Jew"), which became a source of jokes about The Holocaust and killing Jews. Anti-Semitism is currently on the rise throughout Europe. The Union of Jewish French Students (UEJF) and other human-rights groups sought disclosure of the identities of those behind the hashtags. Twitter refused, though it removed some of the more outrageous content. In January, [...]


UK Court Finds Tweet Libelous Because Of Implied Meaning

twitter-legal-law Could a tweet that doesn't say anything overtly defamatory get you sued for libel in the UK? The answer is yes. In what appears to be the first case of its kind, a UK court has found that the implications of a tweet (against the backdrop of its larger context) could be the basis for a finding of libel and damages against a defendant. Here's the tweet in question: "Why is Lord McAlpine trending? *Innocent face*" There's nothing overtly libelous about this. Rather, the implications behind the tweet were found to be defamatory. Now, the factual background: A November 2012 BBC report abou [...]


Google: Government Requests To Remove Content Spiked In First Half Of 2012

remove content Google announced that the number of content removal requests submitted by governments have spiked in the first half of the year. From January through June 2012, there were there were 1,791 requests from government officials around the world to remove 17,746 pieces of content, almost double the previous six-month period. Here is the chart showing the recent spike in content removal requests: From January to June 2012, the following countries made the most requests to remove content: Turkey (501) United States (273) Germany (247) Brazil (191) United Kingdom (97) Gover [...]


Twitter Will Hide, Not Remove, Tweets That Violate Copyrights

twitter-legal-law Twitter is changing how it handles legal requests against individual tweets that violate copyright. Rather than remove the tweets altogether, Twitter will now hide the tweets and show a message alerting readers that the original tweet is being withheld. GigaOm first reported the news on Sunday, following a tweet from Jeremy Kessel, Twitter's manager of legal policy. Kessel linked to the new policy in Twitter's help center, which reads as follows: In an effort to be as transparent as possible regarding the removal or restriction of access to user-posted content, we clearly mark withhe [...]


Twitter Takes First Country-Specific Censorship Action, Against Hate Group In Germany

Twitter Logo Earlier this year, Twitter added the ability to block Twitter accounts and tweets by a country-by-country basis, in case it needed to respond to legal requests. Nine months later, the company has done this for the first time, for a hate group based in Germany. The Financial Times spotted the action and reported it in a blog post today. The story come out of information Twitter sent to Chilling Effects last month, part of Twitter's mechanism for being transparent about censorship requests. The Chilling Effects filing reveals that a Germany ministry (the Ministry of the Interior for Lower [...]


Twitter Now Able To Censor Tweets, If Required By Law, On A Country-By-Country Basis

globe-flags-censored-featured Until now, Twitter's not had the ability to censor certain tweets or accounts, to prevent them from being seen -- if legally required -- by users in particular countries. That's now changed, though Twitter stresses that it hasn't yet used this new ability and that should it have to, anything withheld will be disclosed. Twitter has shared the news on its blog, saying: As we continue to grow internationally, we will enter countries that have different ideas about the contours of freedom of expression. Some differ so much from our ideas that we will not be able to exist there. Others are simi [...]


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