• http://steveplunkett.com @steveplunkett

    two words.. insect pr0n

  • http://twitter.com/RavenCourtney Courtney Seiter

    Steve, you’re supposed to share *your* embarrassing things, not tell more embarrassing things about me and my public speaking secrets! ;)

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/NWEV6HLD43RCSGOX246M4HHBJI Jeremy

    But can an employer refuse to hire you because you talked about something on a social media site? I was looking at explicit ‘art’ once and clicked ‘like’ and later found it on my fb timeline. I eventually found a way to remove it.

  • http://twitter.com/RavenCourtney Courtney Seiter

    Jeremy, that’s a fair point. I think of working in social media similar to being a celebrity (minus, like, every possible perk) in that you have to be aware anything you say or do is more or less in the public eye. Actually, that’s true for anyone who even USES social media.

  • http://twitter.com/inSparq inSparq

    It’s good that branding is embracing vulnerability. The key thing brands have to remember is that people/potential customers want to interact with humans. Vulnerability humanizes brands. And it can be endearing for the average person. Sure, there are fears, but those are the same fears any person would have. No one can be perfect. Brands shouldn’t be expected to either.

  • http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

    I think many companies are afraid of letting go and losing control on social media because they don’t like putting their brand in the hands of their customers. But people want to do business with other people, not nameless companies. Sharing a little vulnerability goes a long way in building real relationships.

  • http://twitter.com/RavenCourtney Courtney Seiter

    Exactly. Vulnerability plus customer empathy is a winning social media formula.

  • http://twitter.com/RavenCourtney Courtney Seiter

    Absolutely. It’s definitely a little scary, particularly for “old guard” businesses. But with what you give up, you gain so much more.

  • Alex Harford

    Embarrassing? When I was moving out of an old office recently I badly cut my thumb on a sellotape dispenser. Moving into the new office a few days later, there was even more blood when I cut my finger on a PC. They were the finger and thumb I use for writing and tying shoelaces, so both were difficult for a day or two…

    I am quite a cynical person, but to me too many brands seem like they’re trying too hard or come across as fake when they’re intending to look more human. That’s more likely to turn me off them than want to interact or make a purchase with them. They’re a business and are around to make money so there’s no harm in being honest about that. For the brands who genuinely care about their customers it comes across much more naturally. I think I’d respect a company (whatever their size) for revealing their failings and how they could have done things better, or how they will do things better in the future – as well as showing vulnerability they’d be giving out decent advice.

  • Alex Harford

    Edit: sorry – duplicate post.

  • http://twitter.com/RavenCourtney Courtney Seiter

    Ouch, Alex! I totally agree that it can get stilted and not-so-genuine when brands try to turn on their “hey, we’re just like you” voice. That’s why I think understanding empathy and vulnerability is important. Rather than just tell practitioners to be human and personable, it’s helpful to think about what that MEANS for a brand.